Red Rising

Red Rising (Red Rising, #1) by Pierce Brown

My rating: five stars

Genre: YA Dystopian

Edition: paperback

Goodreads Summary: Darrow is a Red, a member of the lowest caste in the color-coded society of the future. Like his fellow Reds, he works all day, believing that he and his people are making the surface of Mars livable for future generations. Yet he spends his life willingly, knowing that his blood and sweat will one day result in a better world for his children. But Darrow and his kind have been betrayed. Soon he discovers that humanity already reached the surface generations ago. Vast cities and sprawling parks spread across the planet. Darrow—and Reds like him—are nothing more than slaves to a decadent ruling class.

Inspired by a longing for justice, and driven by the memory of lost love, Darrow sacrifices everything to infiltrate the legendary Institute, a proving ground for the dominant Gold caste, where the next generation of humanity’s overlords struggle for power. He will be forced to compete for his life and the very future of civilization against the best and most brutal of Society’s ruling class. There, he will stop at nothing to bring down his enemies… even if it means he has to become one of them to do so.

Red Rising is one of my friend’s favorite series in the world, so of course I had to pick it up and see what it was about. Let me just say I am so glad that I went into this book not knowing very much about it. It completely went in a direction that I did not expect, and I will not spoil that in this review.

Likes: The main thing that I appreciated was how crazy it got. I did not expect the book to go in the direction it did, and I love that! I wish I could say more about it, but I think it is best for people to go into this book not knowing much. I also liked the characters. Pierce Brown wrote the characters in such a way that they are both likable and not likeable at the same time. There are some villains that I couldn’t help but like, and there were some “good” people that had to do terrible things. This is a wonderful aspect to the story, I love complex characters. This book goes into the fact that not everything is black and white in life, there are a ton of shades of grey. Darrow went into life thinking a certain thing (that I can’t really talk about), but towards the end of the book he discovered that what he thought he knew was not completely correct. I love this growth and the philosophical aspect to the story.

Dislikes: There is a feud that starts between Darrow and another character later in this book and it makes no sense to me. It is hard to explain without giving spoilers, but basically this person tries to destroy Darrow’s life for something that Darrow could not control. It just seems so outrageous and completely out of character. It seems to happen for no other reason than for the plot. Another problem that I had with this book is that Darrow seems to always have a solution to everything. He is usually always smarter than everyone else around him and it just seems illogical and improbable. It is hard to imagine that he could be that much smarter than everyone else, to a point where it seems like he can read their minds.

Overall, I loved this book! I gave it five out of five stars because, even though there were some aspects that I did not enjoy, I still had a wonderful time reading it and think that it is a well written book. I wish that the feud had come about differently to where it made more sense, and I wish that Darrow’s level of intelligence didn’t seem completely illogical. However, I am still so excited for the rest of the series, the ending left me having no clue where the next book is going to go, and I love that!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s